He went to the Cross For Me

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He set His face For Jerusalem
When the days drew near for him to be taken up, he set his face to go to Jerusalem. And he sent messengers ahead of him, who went and entered a village of the Samaritans, to make preparations for him. But the people did not receive him, because his face was set toward Jerusalem. And when his disciples James and John saw it, they said, “Lord, do you want us
to tell fire to come down from heaven and consume them?” But he turned and rebuked them. And they went on to another village. (Luke 9:51–56)
In Luke 9:51–56, we learn how not to understand Palm Sunday.
To set his face towards Jerusalem meant something very different for Jesus than it did for the disciples. You can see the visions of greatness that danced in their heads in verse 46: “An argument arose among them as to which of them was the greatest.” Jerusalem and glory were just around the corner. O what it would mean when Jesus took the throne!
But Jesus had another vision in his head. One won- ders how he carried it all alone and for so long.
Here’s what Jerusalem meant for Jesus: “I must go on my way today and tomorrow and the day following, for it cannot be that a prophet should perish away from Jerusalem” (Luke 13:33). Jerusalem meant one thing for Jesus: certain death. Nor was he under any illusion of a quick and heroic death. He predicted in Luke 18:31–33:
“See, we are going up to Jerusalem, and everything that is written about the Son of Man by the prophets will be accomplished. For he will be delivered over to the Gen- tiles and will be mocked and shamefully treated and spit upon. And after flogging him, they will kill him.”
When Jesus set his face to go to Jerusalem, he set his face to die. Thank you Lord for being obedient to go to the cross for mankind, that did not deserve You dying for, but it was Love for us, and obedience for His Father, when I think of all He suffered for me, my heart breaks and it make me love Him more and more and more.

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